Is the pathogen our biggest enemy? – The use of Transfer Factors to optimize our immune response

The immune response is a sophisticated process with an outcome that is specific to the individual and often hard to predict. Why is it, for instance, that a pupil on a school trip hiking through the woods develops multi-systemic disease from one tick bite, whereas the Ranger working in the same woods for years has been exposed to numerous bites and never falls ill? And why do some people recover quickly from infections, whereas in others the seemingly harmless infection turns into a lifetime of suffering?

Some people apparently are genomically limited when it comes to immunity. In 20 percent of all infections there is a progression to chronic inflammation and chronic illness. A healthy and efficient immune system should have the capability to eradicate the pathogen.

When Dr. Lawrence discovered Transfer Factors he unlocked some groundbreaking research that helps provide answers in chronic pathologies. In his first publication he described extracting intracellular fluid from the white blood cells of patients positive for tuberculosis. This was transferred to patients who were seronegative. Results showed that these patients then tested positive in a delayed hypersensitivity test, thus presenting with tuberculosis. The bottom line was: immunity could be transferred from one patient to another.

The mystery molecules responsible for this process were called Transfer Factors and moving forwards could be an effective tool used to support patients with an insufficient immune response and help cure their chronic pathologies. The molecules themselves are messenger peptides, responsible for the communication between our T-cells which are built from short strands of amino acids. They can be isolated from colostrum or be extracted from leukocytes or lymphocytes.

To understand the role Transfer Factors could play in aberrant immune response, we must first go back to the basics of functional immunity. Natural immune response is activated when our body is invaded by pathogens or antigens. Pathogens are captured by a first wave of a certain kinds of white blood cells, antigen presenting cells (APR) or macrophages. These APRs recognize the antigens because they have corresponding receptors, Toll-like receptors (TLR). When this occurs, APR cells produce substances with a signaling function, a cry for help as it were, a signal that the body needs to respond further – a higher state of alert. These substances are called inflammatory cytokines. Inflammation is then generated, and the first symptoms start to show up typically as pain and fever.

The first stage of this process took place in the innate part of our immunity, the immediate response. When the first clinical signs of inflammation become apparent, this is then reported to our adaptive immune response. This is the organized part that has a memory function. But the inflammatory cytokines should be switched off at some point, so it should only be a short duration inflammatory signal. It is in this stage that statistics show abnormal or aberrant response in 20 percent of patients. In normal situations there should first be an upregulation (detecting invaders, recognized by the TLR, what do they detect: surface proteins on the invaders), then communication from the innate immune response to the adaptive immune response, after a while the systems are then restored to default and the inflammatory response is then switched off. In immune related disorders the inflammation cannot be switched off and it then evolves into chronic inflammation. This results in damage, often not only in the form of chronic inflammation but sometimes also in an autoimmune response. Autoimmunity occurs when the immune response is generated and then directed against self-proteins. Blood panels for these patients will show autoantibodies.

The second stage should be organized based on the reports from our innate immunity, further organization of this function requires further differentiation of T-cells into Th 1 or Th 2.

Th 1 response targets intra and extracellular infections, whereas Th 2 only targets extracellular infections. That is why Th 1 is referred to as cellular immunity and Th 2 as humoral immunity. A healthy immune response is simply a balance between Th 1 and Th 2, for which the regulatory T-cells are responsible. So, what happens in aberrant immune response? Initially, there is chronic inflammation with resulting damage. Secondly, the body cannot distinguish me from not-me because the Th 1/Th 2 balance is out of balance and either one is dominant. The immune system then reacts against self-tissue.

Why does this happen in some patients, not in others? Patients with abnormal immunity have a genetic modification in the Toll-like receptors, generating a different inflammatory signal. Apart from genetics, age is also a contributory factor: the older patients are, the higher the risk of abnormal immune response.

This is where Transfer Factors come into play. They can normalize the immune response, especially the Th 1 division responsible for cellular level activity. Therefore, an appropriate application for the use of Transfer Factors would be a poor immune response. Depending on the type of infection the response will be led by either Th 1 or Th 2. In the Th 2 response the agents are antibodies, whereas in Th 1 they are Natural Killer cells (NK cells). If you want to determine the strength of an immune system you can test NK cell activity. Transfer Factors will increase the number of a patient’s macrophages (increasing ability to capture pathogens) and NK cells, leading to a general strengthening of the Th 1 response.

Therefore, the use of Transfer Factors can be useful in patients with poor immunity and chronically ill patients. However, it is also possible to use them preventatively as an alternative to vaccination. Our body does not distinguish between natural and supplemented transfer factors. Both for curative and preventative use, a standardized formula composition is a good option. A clinical study conducted by Garth I. Nicolson, Rita R. Ellithorpe et al. with poor immunity patients showed that after 1 month, activity of NK cells improved by 248 percent with usual daily dosage of 2 capsules. If the dosage is increased to 2/2, the improvement is 620 percent. So higher dosage should be considered when beginning a program or in acute conditions.

There are also more specific, targeted formulations. First, a formulation targeting pathogens one is exposed to during a tick bite (bartonella, babaesia, ehrlichia). Another formulation specifically targets mold and biotoxins. Sometimes people get ill from reactivating infections and for those applications, there is a third formulation. In patients suffering from ebv, cmv, chlamydia, herpes and mycoplasma immunity is suppressed, and infections reactivate. In an efficient treatment approach immunity is strengthened with a standardized composition combined with a more specific formulation of Transfer Factors targeting the reactivating infections.

In a study with patients suffering from recurrent herpes infections with labial and genital outbreaks (Kahn et al./Pizza et al.) we see a decrease in frequency of outbreaks by 50 percent but also the number of T-cells increased. As a comparison, Acyclovir will only shorten the duration of the outbreaks without influencing frequency or the number of T-cells.

Immune disorders are a fundamental aspect of many pathologies, so they should be properly addressed. The clear majority of chronic pathologies are immune related. Antibiotics are unable to fix Th 1/Th 2 shift. In many situations when the source of the infection is eradicated, an imbalanced immune system is the inevitable result. Transfer Factors provide an efficient and safe restorative therapy to rebuild immune response. Failure to address immune abnormalities is one of the most common causes of diagnostic and treatment failure.

When it comes to strengthening our immune response to help fight infections, chronic infections and as a preventative for re-occurring infections, Transfer Factors help address the true origin of the problem.

Author Biography

As a Doctor in Pharmaceutical Science Pol De Saedeleer received his degree and training at the University of Louvain, where he graduated in 1991.

 He obtained his Master’s degree in Nutritional & Phytotherapeutical Therapies at IMPB in Louvain-La-Neuve and his Master’s degree in Homeopathic Practice at VSU in Ghent. In his daily activities as a pharmacist Pol De Saedeleer is focused on enhancing therapeutic results by choosing the most bioavailable molecules and optimal delivery systems in consultations with medical doctors throughout Europe and beyond. He translates science-based ingredient research into practical information and useful applications. Asked to present at medical conferences, more intimate workshops, and one-on-one information sessions, he provides evidence-oriented medicine and pharmaceutical and nutritional recommendations to improve patient health. He is also the head of a Belgian compounding pharmacy and Scientific Director of two research focused nutritional laboratories.

Pol De Saedeleer has taken a particular interest in dealing with immune-related pathologies. He has given seminars and workshops regarding this topic all over Europe. As part of the Belgian medical community, Pol De Saedeleer was selected as chairperson for the first ever Belgian Lyme Conference, taking place in Antwerp on September 12th and 13th 2015.

 In 2016 he accepted the position of Chairman of the European ILADS Committee. He is a regular speaker at several leading international scientific conferences like A4M, ILADS and the German Borreliose Society. Recently he has also taken up the position of chair and organizer of the International Conference of Chronic Pathologies in Antwerp, an annual international conference with a high turnout of medical professionals and experts. It is one of the largest European conferences with a strong focus on sharing and exchanging information between physicians.

  

Immune response is a sophisticated process with an outcome that is individual and often hard to predict. Why is it, for instance, that a pupil on a school trip hiking through the woods develops multi-systemic disease from one tick bite, whereas the ranger working in the same woods for years has been exposed to numerous bites and never falls ill? And how come some people recover quickly from infections, whereas in others the seemingly harmless infection turns into a lifetime of suffering?

Some people apparently are genomically limited when it comes to immunity. In 20 percent of all infections there is an evolution to chronic inflammation and chronic illness instead of being able to eradicate the pathogen and this is because of insufficient immune response due to said limitation. When Dr. Lawrence discovered Transfer Factors he unlocked some groundbreaking options for providing answers to chronic pathologies. In his first publication he described extracting intracellular fluid from white blood cells from patients positive for tuberculosis. This was transferred to patients who were seronegative. Results showed that these patients then tested positive in a delayed hypersensitivity test, thus presenting with tuberculosis. Bottom line: immunity could be transferred from one patient to another. The mystery molecules responsible for this process were coined Transfer Factors and could thenceforth be used to support patients with insufficient immune response and cure their chronic pathology. The molecules are messenger peptides, responsible for the communication between our T-cells, built from short strands of amino acids. They can be isolated from colostrum or be extracted from leukocytes or lymphocytes.

To understand the role Transfer Factors could play in aberrant immune response, we must first go back to the basics of normal immunity. Natural immune response is activated when our body is intruded by pathogens or antigens. Pathogens are captured by a first series of white blood cells, antigen presenting cells (APR) or macrophages. These APRs recognize the antigens because they have corresponding receptors, Toll-like receptors (TLR). Upon this, APR cells produce substances with a signaling function, a cry for help as it were, a signal that the body needs to organize further. These substances are called inflammatory cytokines. Basically, an inflammation is generated and the first signs show up as pain and fever.

The first stage of these reactions took place in the innate part of our immunity, the immediate response. When the first clinical signs of inflammation show up, this is reported to our adaptive immune response. This is the organized part that has a memory. But the inflammatory cytokines should be switched off at some point, so it should only be a short inflammatory signal. It is in this stage that statistics show abnormal or aberrant response in 20 percent of patients. In normal situations there should first be an upregulation (detecting invaders, recognized by the TLR, what do they detect: surface proteins on the invaders), then communication from the innate immune response to the adaptive, after a while the systems are restored and the inflammation is switched off. In immune related disorders the inflammation cannot be switched off and it evolves to a chronic inflammation. This results in damage, often not only in the form of chronic inflammation but sometimes also in autoimmune response. Autoimmunity happens when immune response is generated against self-proteins. Blood panels for these patients will show autoantibodies.

The second stage should be organized based on the reports from our innate immunity, further organization of this part means further differentiation of T-cells into Th 1 or Th 2. Th 1 response targets intra- and extracellular infections, whereas Th 2 only targets the extracellular ones. That is why Th 1 is also called cellular immunity, Th 2 is humoral immunity. Healthy immune response is basically a balance between Th 1 and Th 2, for which regulatory T-cells are responsible. So, what happens in aberrant immune response? First of all, there is chronic inflammation with resulting damage. Secondly, the body cannot distinguish me from not-me because the Th 1/Th 2 balance is off and either one is dominant. The immune system reacts against self-tissue.

Why does this happen in some patients, not in others? Patients with abnormal immunity have a genetic modification in the Toll-like receptors, generating a different inflammatory signal. Apart from genetics, also age is a limiting factor: the older patients are, the higher the risk of abnormal immune response.

This is where Transfer Factors come into play. They are capable of normalizing immune response, especially the Th 1 part responsible for the cellular level. So, an indication to use Transfer Factors is poor immune response. Depending on the type of infection the response will be led by either Th 1 or Th 2. In Th 2 the agents are antibodies, whereas Th 1 has Natural Killer cells (NK cells). If you want to determine the strength of an immune system you can test NK cell activity. Transfer Factors will increase the number of a patient’s macrophages (more ability for capture) and NK cells, leading to general strengthening of the Th 1 response.

Therefore, the use of Transfer Factors can be useful in patients with poor immunity, chronically ill patients. However, it is also possible to use them preventatively, basically as an alternative to vaccination. Our body does not distinguish between natural and supplemented transfer factors. Both for curative and preventative use, a standardized composition is a good option. A clinical study conducted by Garth I. Nicolson, Rita R. Ellithorpe et al. with poor immunity patients showed that after 1 month, activity of NK cells improved by 248 percent with usual daily dosage of 2 capsules. If the dosage is increased to 2/2, the improvement is 620 percent. So higher dosage should be considered when beginning a program or in acute conditions.

There are also more specific compositions. First, a formulation targeting pathogens one is exposed to during a tick bite (bartonella, babaesia, ehrlichia). Another formulation specifically targets mold and biotoxins. But sometimes people get ill from reactivating infections. For those situations, there is a third formulation. In patients suffering from ebv, cmv, chlamydia, herpes and mycoplasma immunity is suppressed, and infections reactivate. In an efficient treatment approach immunity is strengthened with a standardized composition combined with a more specific formulation of Transfer Factors targeting the reactivating infections.

In a study with patients suffering from recurrent herpes infections with labial and genital outbreaks (Kahn et al./Pizza et al.) we see a decrease in frequency of outbreaks by 50 percent but also the number of T-cells increased. As a comparison, Acyclovir will only shorten the duration of the outbreaks without influencing frequency or the number of T-cells.

Immune disorders are paramount in many pathologies, so they should be properly addressed. The majority of chronic pathologies are immune related. Antibiotics are unable to fix Th 1/Th 2 shift. In many situations when the source of the infection is eradicated, an imbalanced immune system is left. Transfer Factors provide an efficient and safe restorative therapy to rebuild immune response. Failure to address immune abnormalities are common causes of diagnostic and treatment failure. When it comes to strengthening our immune response in prevention, infection or chronic infection, with Transfer Factors the real origin of the problem will be addressed.